Le Devoir http://rougesquad.org/taxonomy/term/3/all en Americans turn a deaf ear to Quebec student conflict http://rougesquad.org/en/content/americans-turn-deaf-ear-quebec-student-conflict <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-06-04T00:00:00-04:00">Monday, June 4, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>John R. MacArthur, <em>Le Devoir</em></p> <p>I'm ashamed when I think of the revolt against tuition fee hikes in Quebec, and I'm ashamed for two reasons: first, because my colleagues in American newspapers and magazines have shown a marked lack of interest in a crisis that is unfolding right under their noses; second, because American students and their parents, themselves exhausted by the obscenely high cost of four years of U.S. college* education, have almost nothing to say on the topic.</p> <p>I admit that Bill 78 and its repercussions on civil liberties have roused the barons of the English-speaking press from their previous slumber. For example, <em>Time Magazine</em> appears to be a tad annoyed that the festive Montréal of which they are so fond is now under siege by thousands of protestors and police: we are far from the lilting Jazz-Festival atmosphere. And yet this widely read magazine cannot help attempting to conjure up a return to the tourist norm: in its online edition last week, after the second paragraph of a piece on the Quebec uprising, <em>Time's </em>editorial staff inserted a link entitled "Three hours in Montreal," proposing a whirlwind tour of museums, the Plateau, and Saint-Laurent Boulevard, to give visitors a taste of Montreal's joie de vivre.</p> <p></div></div></div> Wed, 06 Jun 2012 14:46:30 +0000 admin 114 at http://rougesquad.org Monarcho-liberals versus Republicans http://rougesquad.org/en/content/monarcho-liberals-versus-republicans <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-06-02T00:00:00-04:00">Saturday, June 2, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Stéphane Baillargeon, Le Devoir</p> <p>The student conflict has turned into a social crisis. At the heart of the matter: who is taking to the streets now more than ever in the history of Quebec, and why?</p> <p>It comes down to elected officials versus the people in the street. Representing the elected officials, Jean Charest renewed his appeal for calm last Thursday. We will find out later today if his appeal was heeded on the street, where students, who have been striking for over one hundred days and some dozens of nights, are mobilizing for yet another demonstration.</p> <p>Acknowledging the failed negotiations, the premier repeated that there will be an election within eighteen months and that "this will be the moment for people to express their disagreement democratically." He added that the most radical of the young negotiators had gone too far by threatening to disrupt the F1 Grand Prix which will take place in Montreal next weekend.</p> <p></div></div></div> Thu, 09 Aug 2012 01:59:48 +0000 admin 119 at http://rougesquad.org The Youth Pushing Quebec Toward Maturity http://rougesquad.org/en/content/youth-pushing-quebec-toward-maturity <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-04-28T00:00:00-04:00">Saturday, April 28, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>By Catherine Lalonde</p> <p><em>Faced with the failure of neoliberalism, generation "Y" advances a humanistic vision for the long term.</em></p> <p>The leaders of the student movement, Jeanne Reynolds, Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois and Léo Bureau-Blouin, have become spokespeople for a generation of young people, forced to push Quebec toward greater maturity.</p> <p>In the right-hand corner, the government avoidance dance. The excuses to avoid addressing tuition hikes—the basis for the strike movement. The semantic dickering on the question of violence in order to detract from the complexity of the issues at hand, to discredit a more nuanced view, the condescension. In the left-hand corner, the youth. Though not expected to look beyond the immediate future, they say they are fighting for the children of the future. They refuse to be divided, are committed to solidarity and democracy, and fully embody their ideology. Could they be ushering in the age of reason in Quebec, long held to be in its adolescence?</p> <p></div></div></div> Mon, 07 May 2012 20:27:58 +0000 admin 104 at http://rougesquad.org Black Bloc and Red Square http://rougesquad.org/en/content/black-bloc-and-red-square <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-04-28T00:00:00-04:00">Saturday, April 28, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>By Francis Dupuis-Déri - Political science professor at UQAM and author of the book <em>Les Black Blocs</em> (Lux, 2007) </p> <p>For weeks now, debates have been raging over “Black Blocs,” described as “Anarchist groups” “vandals” “masked, hooded, black clad and waving black flags.” I have witnessed several incidents during demonstrations where demonstrators have insulted and physically attacked Black Bloc members in the name of non-violence.</p> <p>Black Blocs can also, of course, simply march in the demonstration as union, NGO, and political party contingents do, crammed together behind their banners, following their leaders. I’ve seen Black Blocs in Montréal and elsewhere do just that, marching calmly, an expression of their radical critique of capitalism or of the State through their mere presence. But it’s usually when Black Blocs use direct action that the media notice their existence. And yet Black Blocs are not a new phenomenon. A look back on an eventful history.</p> <p></div></div></div> Sun, 06 May 2012 18:31:32 +0000 admin 98 at http://rougesquad.org Guy Rocher: The Student Movement’s Cause is Just http://rougesquad.org/en/content/guy-rocher-student-movement%E2%80%99s-cause-just <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-04-11T00:00:00-04:00">Wednesday, April 11, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>Lisa-Marie Gervais, <em>Le Devoir</em></p> <p><strong>One of Québec's education system founders advocates abolishing tuition fees</strong></p> <p>Sociologist Guy Rocher is taking sides: he’s been in the streets with the students since the start of the strike mobilization. And he believes in demanding more than a tuition freeze, in organizing for free education, a struggle he believes is “just,” he told <i>Le Devoir</i> in an interview. “Free education is something we should be working towards,” said Mr. Rocher. “If we start out with this basic principle, we’ll be forced to re-think our policies completely. As long as we stay on the subject of freezes and hikes, we’ll be limited to discussing the numbers.”</p> <p></div></div></div> Mon, 04 Jun 2012 20:09:46 +0000 admin 110 at http://rougesquad.org Student strike - Teachers are apprehensive about the return to class http://rougesquad.org/en/content/student-strike-teachers-are-apprehensive-about-return-class <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-04-11T00:00:00-04:00">Wednesday, April 11, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>by Lisa-Marie Gervais</p> <p>Translation:  Travis Ahearn</p> <p><em>Despite the lack of instruction, they will have to evaluate student performance</em></p> <p>If a student has only finished half a course, on what is he/she marked? Annie Lalancette, part-time faculty in the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment at Concordia University is wondering this, herself.  ''I'm a teacher and I have no idea.  I only gave 7 out of 13 courses.  Frederick Lowy (the University's president) says that professors have academic liberty to evaluate students, but how does one do this, when some haven't even been given the course content?'' she asks.</p></div></div></div> Wed, 18 Apr 2012 16:02:43 +0000 admin 71 at http://rougesquad.org Six Legal Questions about the Student Strike http://rougesquad.org/en/content/six-legal-questions-about-student-strike <div class="field field-name-field-publication-date field-type-datetime field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><span class="date-display-single" property="dc:date" datatype="xsd:dateTime" content="2012-04-03T00:00:00-04:00">Tuesday, April 3, 2012</span></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-publication-source field-type-taxonomy-term-reference field-label-inline clearfix"><h3 class="field-label">Source: </h3><ul class="links inline"><li class="taxonomy-term-reference-0"><a href="/source/le-devoir" typeof="skos:Concept" property="rdfs:label skos:prefLabel" datatype="">Le Devoir</a></li></ul></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even" property="content:encoded"><p>By Lise-Marie Gervais, Education.</p> <p>Finn Makela is an assistant professor and director of the Common Law and Transnational Law programs at Université de Sherbrooke Faculty of Law.</p> <p><strong>Le Devoir: Is the strike legal?</strong></p> <p>Finn Makela: The legislation neither allows nor condemns the strike. The law is simply silent on that question. It does not say it is permitted but it does not say that it is not permitted.</p> <p><strong>Le Devoir: Are students allowed to picket?</strong></p></div></div></div> Sun, 15 Apr 2012 15:23:43 +0000 florecita 62 at http://rougesquad.org